A draw in chess - what is it, in which cases a draw is made?
A draw in chess is the result of a game in which there is no winner or loser. Both opponents get half a point if the game ends in a…

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How to get rid of yawns and chess views
To begin with, we’ll understand how yawns differ from views. In his book Secrets of Practical Chess, John Nunn wrote the following: “Views and yawns are two varieties of the…

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Forbidden moves: how to win chess without touching the pieces
Many grandmasters used psychological techniques that can hardly be considered correct. Worthy debut You can secure your victory without even touching the pieces. One of the scandalous cases in the…

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concrete experience

On improving the chess player

Each chess player is improving in his own ways. Our masters care little about the transfer of their experience to youth. forcing many first-timers gropingly to seek the right methods of working on themselves. A typical example of such a “wandering in the dark” is my quest for chess. The desire to facilitate the task of young Soviet chess players seeking to improve their skills suggested the idea of ​​this article to me. I hope that my thoughts, supported by the concrete experience of chess improvement, will be able to provide them with at least some help.

I got the first category in 1934. By this time I already had a number of successes in competitions. Further performances in tournaments of the first category and mixed tournaments with the participation of the Continue reading

Elephant in chess - how does a piece move?
An elephant in chess is a piece located on the board at the beginning of the game on cells c1, f1 (for white) and c8, f8 (for black). Each of…

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A rook in chess - how does a piece move?
A rook in chess is one of the most powerful pieces. Best of all, the potential of the rook can be realized if there are no obstacles in its way…

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Sally Landau and Mikhail Tal: And at night he taught her to play chess ...
He could play blindly on ten chessboards, not recording anything and memorizing his every move, while at the same time accurately calculating the opponent's moves ahead. Mikhail Tal was a…

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